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Marwa ElMorsy

well being unemployment

Maintaining Your Well-being During Unemployment and Job Search

By Jobseeker

Unemployment can be a challenging phase in life. It is essential to maintain mental well-being during unemployment, and there are a few things that individuals can do to achieve this.

While exploring coping strategies, it is crucial to consider the varying needs of individuals who are facing multiple challenges. Here are a few tips that can help improve your well-being while looking for a new job.

Prioritize Self-Care During Unemployment

Unemployment can be an emotionally and mentally draining experience. The constant job searching, rejection, and financial strain can take a toll on one’s well-being. That’s why self-care becomes even more important during this challenging time.

The first thing we think about when we hear the word ‘self-care’ is, “Who has time for this luxury?”. But self-care doesn’t necessarily have to be lavish or suggest going to the spa or buying expensive candles.

Self-care looks different for everyone (and yes, you can have it for free). It simply means taking deliberate actions to prioritize your physical, emotional, and mental health. It’s about recognizing and meeting your own needs even when faced with adversity.

Here are a few self-care strategies that can help alleviate the stress of unemployment:

  • Maintain a routine: A daily routine can provide structure and a sense of purpose. Set daily goals, whether to update your resume, network or engage in a hobby – A consistent routine can be extremely helpful in maintaining a sense of normalcy and productivity in your life.
  • Take care of your physical health: It’s important to prioritize exercise, nutritious meals, and adequate sleep. Physical and mental well-being are interconnected, so taking care of your body can improve your mood and energy levels.
  • Practice mindfulness and relaxation techniques: Engage in stress-reducing activities (for up to 15 mins a day) like meditation, deep breathing, and yoga to improve mental well-being during unemployment and reduce anxiety.
  • Invest in personal development: Use this time to learn new skills, pursue hobbies, or explore new interests. Engaging in activities that bring you joy and fulfillment can boost your self-esteem and provide a sense of purpose.

It’s important to prioritize self-care, not just for yourself but for those around you. Taking care of your mental health increases your chances of finding new opportunities and maintaining a positive mindset.

Build a Support Network

Unemployment can often lead to feelings of isolation and loneliness. Without the daily interactions that come with a job, individuals may be cut off from their social circles and support systems. 

Here is how to build a strong support network during this time:

  • Reach out to friends and family members who can provide emotional support, encouragement, and a listening ear. 
  • Connect with others who are experiencing or have experienced unemployment. This can give a sense of solidarity and understanding. They can offer perspective, advice, and even help with job searching or networking. 
  • Join support groups or participate in online communities. Social connections can provide emotional support and a sense of belonging.
  • Find local community resources to help you in your job search. Local job centers and career counselling services can help with job leads, financial assistance, and networking opportunities. These resources can help individuals navigate the job market and improve job search skills

Overcome the Stigma of Unemployment and Mental Health

One of the most significant challenges faced by individuals experiencing unemployment is the stigma attached to it. Society often places a great deal of value on employment and financial success, leading to judgment and misconceptions about those who are unemployed.
This stigma can intensify feelings of shame guilt, and further impacting mental health.

Challenging these stigmatizing beliefs and recognizing that unemployment does not define a person’s worth or abilities is essential. It is a temporary situation that can happen to anyone, regardless of their skills or qualifications. Unemployment can be a result of a complex and ever-changing job market.

  • Awareness is critical to combat the stigma of unemployment and mental health.
  • Sharing your stories and personal experiences can humanize the issue and break stereotypes.
  • Practicing self-compassion and self-acceptance. While it’s natural to feel embarrassed when facing unemployment, it’s important to remember that these feelings are unjustified.

Individuals can overcome the stigma and build a positive mindset by focusing on personal growth, self-care, and resilience.

Seek Professional Help

Unemployment can leave individuals feeling helpless and overwhelmed. It is important to understand that seeking professional help is not a weakness but rather a proactive step towards healing and recovery. Therapy and counselling provide a safe space for individuals to express their emotions, gain perspective, and develop coping strategies.

In addition to traditional therapy, online resources are available for those who may prefer a more convenient and accessible option. 

Local Resouces For Your Well-being During Unemployment

If you or someone you know is struggling with unemployment and mental health, remember that help is available. Reach out to friends, family, or community resources for support. Remember that you are not alone, and there is hope for a brighter future.

Suicide Line (24/7): If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, call  1-833-456-4566 (in Quebec: 1-866-277-3553) or visit suicide.ca

Here are a few free/discounted resources to help you if you’re going through this.

Clinics

Mental health support for Newcomers

 Mental health resources for newcomers in your local language

Mental health support for youth

Mental health support for People with disabilties 

Fraser Health

unemployment mental health

The Silent Struggle: The Impact of Unemployment on Mental Health

By Employer

In today’s fast-paced and competitive world, unemployment has become a silent struggle that affects millions of individuals in Canada. The impact of being unemployed extends far beyond financial stress and insecurity. It takes a toll on mental health, causing anxiety, depression, and a sense of worthlessness.

This article explores the relationship between unemployment and mental health, shedding light on the psychological impact.

Understanding the profound effects of unemployment on mental well-being is crucial to providing the support and resources needed to alleviate this pervasive issue for those who are affected, especially for the diverse groups facing additional challenges, such as newcomers to Canada, individuals with disabilities, and recent graduates.

The Impact of Unemployment

Unemployment can have a significant psychological impact on individuals, often leading to a decline in mental health. Whether the individual is moving to a new country, starting from scratch or losing a job, it can shatter one’s sense of identity and purpose, leaving one feeling lost and without direction. The routine and structure that employment provides are suddenly gone, leaving a void that can be difficult to fill. This loss can trigger feelings of hopelessness, frustration, and despair.

Unemployment can negatively affect an individual’s mental health and well-being. Some of these effects include:

  • Job searching can be tough even for the most resilient individuals. Each rejection letter or failed interview can feel like a personal reflection of one’s worth and abilities, leading to low self-esteem.
  • Financial insecurity can be overwhelming, leading to increased levels of stress and anxiety about making ends meet.
  • The stress often emerges as physical symptoms such as headaches, stomachaches, and difficulty sleeping. 
  • The stigma surrounding unemployment can lead to feelings of shame, isolation, and increased risk of substance abuse.
  • The combination of these factors may contribute to the development or worsening of mental health conditions, such as depression and anxiety disorders.
  • Unemployment can strain familial relationships and lead to increased conflicts within households. Financial stress can strain marriages and partnerships, increasing tension and resentment. This can create a cycle of negative emotions and further impact an individual’s mental well-being.

Unemployment Mental Health Impact on Newcomers to Canada

Picture this: a newcomer coming to Canada and striving for a new life with their family. Imagine adapting to a new country and settling down while being unemployed.

The struggle to secure employment is intertwined with adjusting to a new culture, language, and societal norms. The isolation and loneliness often accompanying being in a new and unfamiliar environment can amplify the psychological toll of unemployment. In these cases, the need for tailored support and resources that address the job search and the adjustment process becomes even more critical.

Family dynamics are also significantly affected, particularly for newcomers, as financial strain and employment uncertainties can strain household relationships. The adjustments required for a new life in Canada become more complex when combined with the additional burden of joblessness.

Unemployment Mental Health Impact on People with Disabilities

While mental health can be a debilitating disability on its own — Over 2 million Canadians aged 15 and older (7.3%) had a mental health-related disability.

Persons with disabilities may face doubling-down on mental health impacts. Additional barriers to employment, accessibility, and exclusion lead to heightened frustration and social isolation.

Unemployment Mental Health Impact on New Grads

Recent graduates, already navigating the competitive nature of the job market, may find the transition into employment more daunting during periods of economic uncertainty.

The intersectionality of these challenges highlights the need for nuanced support systems. Recognizing the diverse experiences within the broader context of unemployment and mental health is crucial for creating a compassionate and inclusive society.

Unemployment Impacts Far Beyond Finances

The repercussions of job loss on mental health involve both financial and non-financial factors, such as concerns about income security, social stigma, diminished self-esteem, and reduced social connections. 

Despite the difficulty in quantifying these effects simultaneously, studies point to non-financial pathways being more influential:

  • A study revealed that the adverse non-financial effects of unemployment significantly outweighed the decrease in life satisfaction attributed to income loss.
  • A U.S.-based study found that unemployed, underemployed, or inactive significantly increased depression compared to those remaining adequately employed. 
  • Research has delved into the impact of unemployment on mental health across age groups. Analyzing data in Canada, researchers found that losing employment between the ages of 31 and 55 increased the risk of experiencing mental distress.

These studies have highlighted the complex relationship between employment status and mental health. It is essential to consider factors such as job quality, age, and duration of unemployment to understand the impact on individuals. In addition, studies have shown that non-financial aspects of job loss have a significant effect on mental health, which challenges the conventional emphasis on the financial dimension.

Underemployment and Mental Health

Employment is not created equal. Struggling individuals are not only looking for just any employment to overcome those issues.

The research underscores the importance of considering job quality in understanding the mental health impact of unemployment. It reveals that poor-quality jobs are more likely to be associated with mental health problems than better-quality jobs. To address this, they introduced the concept of “inadequate employment,” encompassing involuntary part-time work and work for very low wages, aka ‘casual jobs.

Unemployment can have a severe effect on mental health. However, it’s essential to remember that there is always hope. By building a strong support network, challenging the societal stigma that comes with unemployment, and practicing self-care, individuals can successfully navigate this challenging time and eventually find new opportunities. It’s crucial to seek help and utilize the necessary resources to find resilience, hope, and a path toward a brighter future.

It’s necessary for society to recognize the silent struggle of unemployment and provide the support and resources needed to alleviate its impact on mental health. By fostering a compassionate and understanding environment, we can create a society that values individuals, irrespective of their employment status. Want to be part of our mission at Career Edge? Get in touch with us today!

newcomers to canada

8 Common Myths About Hiring Newcomers to Canada

By Recruitment

Immigration to Canada is not new. It has been an integral part of human history. Canada has welcomed immigrants since the first European colonizers of the 16th century.

Today, the government of Canada welcomes around 500,000 new immigrants annually to fill in the skill gap in the job market or improve the growth of the labour force. 

People move in pursuit of a better life, fleeing adversity or responding to global shifts. However, misconceptions often surround newcomers to Canada. Let’s talk about some of those prevalent myths.

Myth 1: Immigrants Take Jobs Away from Canadian Citizens

A common myth suggests immigrants deprive Canadians of job opportunities. But let’s take a closer look at their substantial contributions to economic growth.

Here are a few facts to challenging this myth:

  • The Canadian market shortage drives immigrant skills after thorough research that the government conducted. Canada strategically attracts skilled individuals to maintain economic prosperity.
  • Statistics Canada’s 2022 Labour Force Survey revealed an 8.2% unemployment rate of recent immigrants who have been in Canada for 5 years or less as compared to 5.0% for non-immigrants.
  • Since the mid-2010s, immigrants have contributed 63% of the increase in Ontario’s labour force, much larger than the 39 % from the late 2000s to early 2010s.

The persistent myth that immigrants take jobs away from Canadian citizens is rooted in a misunderstanding of the economic dynamics. For example, temporary foreign workers fill critical gaps in Canadian industries, preventing agricultural sectors from suffering. Sometimes, and for several reasons, newcomers end up with different jobs because they can’t get a job in their field.

During COVID-19, precautionary border closures led to a slowdown in immigration, and we saw a dip in the economy, but experts like Andrew Agopsowicz, a senior economist at the Royal Bank of Canada, emphasized that the resurgence of immigration is vital for our economic recovery.

Think about it: the government wouldn’t even invite newcomers if Canadian citizens had the skills and could fill the jobs. The real issue lies in flawed immigration laws enabling worker exploitation, not immigrants taking jobs.

Myth 2: Immigrants Are a Burden on the Canadian Economy

High-skilled immigrants contribute to a virtuous cycle in the Canadian economy, fostering expansion, boosting productivity, and creating employment opportunities. Their arrival and contribution to the economy (and taxes) enhance the job market and benefit employers, leading to a thriving future in Canada. 

Here are a few stats to support this:

Rather than viewing immigrants as a burden, we should appreciate and celebrate their positive impact on our country’s growth and prosperity.

Myth 3: Newcomers Don’t Speak English or French

Language proficiency is a common concern, but it’s essential to dispel the myth. English is an international language. It’s not unique to North America. Many newcomers will learn English early in their education and use English as a first or second language.

But to counter this myth, here are a few facts:

  • Statistics Canada reveals widespread language abilities and newcomers’ commitment to integrating into Canadian society through language learning. Over 90% of recent immigrants can converse in English or French.
  • Most newcomers must take challenging English tests to obtain Permanent Residency (PR) status as a way for the government to emphasize commitment to solid language skills among those coming to live in Canada.

Myth 4: Immigrants Need a Special Work Permit or Visa

Contrary to a common myth, most immigrants in Canada are not required to have a special work permit or visa to work. 

Here is a few basic info you might need to know if you want to hire newcomers to Canada:

  • Immigrants with Permanent Resident (PR) status don’t need additional work permits; a Social Insurance Number suffices.
  • Refugee claimants receive work permits to contribute to the Canadian workforce.
  • Many work permit scenarios, such as those under trade agreements, are LMIA-exempt.
  • We at Career Edge only work with newcomers in Canada who have open work permits.

For more information about work permits, you can visit the Government of Canada website.

Myth 5: Immigrants to Canada Do Not Want to Work

Many immigrants come to Canada to create a better life and future for themselves and their children. For most, achieving a better life includes securing a suitable and fulfilling job.

  • According to Stat Canada, new immigrants are three times more likely than Canadian-born workers to be found in low-skilled jobs.
  • Between 1993 and 2001, immigrants in Canada for 10 years or less had a higher over-qualification rate. This is not because these jobs are suitable or fulfilling but because immigrants strongly desire to work and contribute to their new homes.

Immigrants are used to hustling; coming to Canada is not an easy feat, and it takes a lot of effort and resources for them to do that. The fact that they are in Canada shows a huge initiative and risk-taking; many are passionate and ready to roll once given a chance.

Myth 6: Internationally Trained Professionals Are Not as Qualified as Canadian Professionals

A persistent myth questions the qualifications of internationally trained professionals compared to their Canadian counterparts. 

Understanding these dynamics is crucial for dispelling myths and fostering an inclusive environment for internationally trained professionals in Canada.

Myth 7: Newcomers Must Have Canadian Experience to Secure Jobs

By expecting Canadian experience, some employers would want to see adaptability to the workplace culture, market trends, market dynamics, legislation, technologies, or occupational language. However, having Canadian experience (or lack thereof) doesn’t guarantee the candidate is suitable for a job or a “cultural fit.” 

The lack of Canadian work experience is a common obstacle for newcomers seeking meaningful employment. Some unconscious biases may be real barriers, sometimes masked as the lack of Canadian work experience.

Newcomer candidates can be invaluable if your company wants to represent the market. They can often offer up insights and contacts in their communities and save their employers time and money. That’s why employers need to break the cycle.

Here are a few solutions to the chicken-and-egg situation:

  • Giving the candidates a chance to represent themselves, many of the highest quality candidates don’t even get the chance for an interview just due to the lack of Canadian experience. 
  • LinkedIn can be utilized to verify candidates’ former employers and references, offering transparency and validating professionalism.
  • Adapting to workplace culture can be learned, and fostering an inclusive environment where individuals thrive and feel accepted is a practice all top employers adopt to contribute to a level playing field for skilled migrants.

Myth 8: Immigration Brings Crime to Canada

While some hold onto the myth that immigrants bring crime to Canada, factual evidence suggests otherwise. Immigrants contribute to the country’s safety and well-being, challenging unfounded assumptions about their impact on crime rates. 

While many newcomers seek refuge in Canada, aiming for a secure and stable life for themselves and their families, immigrants in Canada pose minimal risk to the country’s security and sovereignty. 

Here are a few facts:

As Canada embraces a diverse immigrant population, it’s crucial to dispel myths and appreciate newcomers’ positive contributions to the workplace, cultural, and economic fabric. Let’s foster a more informed and inclusive perspective on immigration.

burnout

Burnout: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment Strategies 

By Workplace Culture

In today’s rapidly evolving and demanding work environments, the looming spectre of burnout has grown more significant than ever. The daily grind and personal and professional pressures can take a toll on both employees and the organizations they work for. 

Recognizing the signs, understanding the root causes, and working to combat burnout has become necessary for leaders and employers alike. This article will delve deeply into burnout, concentrating on how employers and leaders can play a pivotal role in preventing, identifying, and addressing this pervasive issue. 

Signs and Symptoms of Burnout 

So, how does burnout happen? 

Burnout doesn’t happen overnight; it’s a gradual process that can sneak up on you. Early signs and symptoms are like red flags, indicating something is amiss and should be addressed. 

Learn to notice the first signs of burnout, which fall into three categories.

Physical Signs and Symptoms of Burnout

  • Feeling exhausted and drained most of the time.
  • Lowered immunity, leading to frequent illnesses
  • Frequent headaches or muscle pain
  • Changes in appetite or sleep habits

Emotional Signs and Symptoms of Burnout

  • Sense of failure and self-doubt.
  • Consistently sad, overwhelmed, or stressed, even over small issues. 
  • Detachment from loved ones.
  • Lack of motivation and an increasingly cynical and negative outlook.
  • Decreased satisfaction and sense of accomplishment
  • Loss of Interest in activities once enjoyed can feel like chores, leading to mindless activities and social media scrolling.

Behavioural Signs and Symptoms of Burnout

  • Withdrawing from responsibilities.
  • Isolating from others.
  • Procrastinating and taking longer to complete tasks
  • Quickly becoming irritated with colleagues or clients.
  • Skipping work, coming in late, and leaving early.
  • Reduced Productivity and diminished performance.

Depression Vs Burnout 

Many people struggle with depression. While burnout and depression have similar symptoms, they are not the same thing. 

depression vs burnout

Stress Vs Burnout 

If you’re feeling stressed because of an approaching deadline or an interview, which is entirely different than burnout, here is how they are different. 

Stress vs Burnout

What Causes Burnout? 

Burnout can be either circumstantial or existential. Understanding which type you are experiencing can help you customize your recovery approach. 

Chronic stress is the leading cause of burnout, worsened by situational and individual factors. At its core, burnout comes from overlooking the importance of rest. The Effort-Recovery Theory explains that every task consumes us psychologically and cognitively and that recovery through breaks is essential. 

Here are the different factors that might cause burnout. 

Individual Factors

  • Pursuing perfectionism across all aspects of one’s work without considering priorities.
  • Overemphasizing the significance of work, making it the sole focus of one’s life.
  • Low self-esteem, cognitive rigidity, emotional instability, and an external locus of control
  • Difficulty in setting boundaries
  • Having high expectations of oneself and an amplified professional conscience.
  • Struggling with delegation or team collaboration in a stressful environment.
  • Inadequate adaptation strategies, including dependence, poor time management, a high need for support, unwise lifestyle habits, and challenging interpersonal relationships.
  • Possessing a highly driven, ‘A-type’ personality with a strong inclination toward competitiveness and a need for control.

Situational Factors

  • Overwhelming workloads and work overload.
  • Values conflict on the job, where a discrepancy exists between personal and organizational values, leading to stress as workers grapple with the divergence between their beliefs and job requirements.
  • Struggling to maintain a work-life balance because of family responsibilities
  • A lack of control and an inability to participate in decisions related to one’s work
  • Insufficient reward and recognition, encompassing financial compensation, esteem, and respect, can devalue an individual’s contributions and heighten feelings of inefficacy.
  • A ‘Toxic’ Community is characterized by unresolved conflicts, a lack of psychological support, poor communication, and mistrust.
  • Unfair treatment or incivility in the workplace leads to cynicism, anger, and hostility.
  • Poorly defined responsibilities, ambiguous roles, and demanding schedules that persist over time.
  • Unclear Expectations and uncertainty about roles and expectations can lead to stress and frustration.

What are the consequences of untreated Burnout?

Burnout is so dangerous if left untreated. It’s not a wave to ride. Ignoring symptoms or not giving yourself the rest your body needs will lead to severe consequences. You may find yourself stuck in a cycle of burnout that would take years to get out of.

Untreated burnout might also lead to physical illnesses. Some people reported that it led to physical symptoms such as headaches, muscle pains, and depression. 

How to Recover from Burnout 

Burnout is a significant problem which impacts personal well-being and business success. The best strategy to overcome burnout is to react once you recognize signs of it. The earlier you act, the better it will be to prevent and overcome burnout. 

Here is a recovery plan with some activities and lifestyle changes you can try to recover from burnout.

Identify Symptoms and Triggers

  • Recognize and Acknowledge Burnout
  • Understand the signs and symptoms, and be honest with yourself about your mental and emotional state.
  • Figure out the culprit. This will allow you to step away from the stressors. For example, it could be that you haven’t taken any time off in a while or that you’re working on a project that doesn’t align with your work, etc. 

Reevaluate Work & Life

  • Consider adjusting your work environment and readjust your work-life balance
  • Discuss workload or other concerns with your supervisor.
  • Seek Support and communicate with your employer and HR to seek mental health support
  • Consider taking a break from work to rest and recharge. Use this time to focus on self-care and relaxation.
  • Implement lifestyle changes to restructure your life and break the cycle.
  • Reflect on your goals and values to ensure they align with your personal interests and well-being. Make adjustments if necessary.

Inefficacy Recovery

  • Prioritize tasks based on motivation (want-to goals) and necessity (have-to goals).
  • Identify inefficiencies and remove unnecessary steps.
  • Assess the perceived attainability of your goals.

Exhaustion Recovery

  • Reset your sleep schedule: Consistent sleep schedules and relaxing bedtime activities can help you sleep better. Taking naps might help you rest during the day.
  • Allocate time for hobbies, leisure, and activities that bring you joy.
  • Prioritize nourishing meals, eat a balanced diet and avoid fast food even if you use meal kits or grocery delivery to reduce stressors.
  • Exercise can improve your mental health and reduce depression and anxiety. You don’t need much gear to start, or you can set up a home gym.
  • Engage in self-care activities that promote relaxation and stress relief. 

Cynicism Recovery 

  • Reframe Your approach/avoidance goals
  • Split your goals into approach-focused and avoidance-focused tasks.
  • Reframe avoidance-focused goals into approach-focused ones.
  • Set implementation intentions for goals that remain in the avoidance-focused category

Mental Health Recovery

  • Journaling can be an effective method to track your habits and mood in an analog and private way, as well as reflect on what matters to you in your career and personal life.
  • Practice self-compassion. Cut yourself some slack and normalize taking time to recover.
  • Track your stress levels can help you spot and reduce stress when you’re overwhelmed.
  • Implement stress management techniques into your daily routine, such as meditation, breathing exercises, calming massages, and relaxation playlists.
  • Establish personal and professional boundaries. Learn to say no to additional commitments when necessary to protect your well-being.
  • Talk to your friends and family about your stress levels and accept their support. 
  • Talk to a mental health professional who can provide expert advice and guidance.

How Long Does It Take To Recover From Burnout? 

The recovery length varies from person to person, the situation, but the strategies and timing of the intervention you apply can make a big difference. 

Because of variation, recovery time can take anywhere from a few weeks to several years.

Recovering from burnout can be a challenging journey, but it’s possible with the right strategies and support. Remember that burnout recovery is a personal journey, and it may take time. Be patient with yourself and prioritize self-care as you work toward a healthier, more balanced life.

National Disability Employment Awareness Month

Employers Need to Do Better for People with Disabilities

By Diversity and Inclusion

National Disability Employment Awareness Month is upon us, a time for reflection and action.

People living with disabilities are hugely under-represented in corporate leadership. A rule change on corporate diversity disclosures in Canada could help change that. But only if the right path is chosen.

At Career Edge, we’re on a mission to promote inclusivity in the workforce. In this article, we’ll share key statistics and actionable steps to encourage employers to hire more people with disabilities.

National Disability Employment Awareness Month

While income disparities continue to exist, with lower educational attainment for individuals with disabilities, in this National Disability Employment Awareness Month, here are a few reminders for employers to aim to achieve.

  • Aspiring to diversify the talent pool.
  • Driving cultural change within businesses.
  • Supporting disabled employees to succeed in the hiring and onboarding process.
  • Providing the needed support and accommodations to perform their jobs. 

Understanding the Status Quo

While the number of people with disabilities in Canada is significant, their participation in the labour market lags behind that of people without disabilities. The unemployment rate for people with disabilities is consistently higher, making National Disability Employment Awareness Month a crucial opportunity to address this disparity.

To grasp the importance of this mission, let’s delve into the numbers:

  • In 2022, the unemployment rate for people with disabilities was 6.9%, nearly double that of those without disabilities, 3.8% (Statistics Canada, 2022)
  • The median hourly wages for those with disabilities were 5.5% lower than those without disabilities. (Statistics Canada 2022)
  • In 2022, among those with disabilities who were employed, one in five 20.3% worked part-time (not by choice), compared with 16.2% among those without disabilities. 
  • Nearly 59% of working-age adults with disabilities are employed, compared to around 80% of those without disabilities (Statistics Canada, 2017).
  • 1.6 million Canadians with disabilities couldn’t afford the necessary aids, devices, or meds.
  • Disability isn’t always obvious. As of 2023, approximately 2.3 million Canadians aged 15 and over are living with severe disabilities that limit their daily activities, according to Statistics Canada. 

How Can Employers Help?

Disabilities still represent a barrier for many Canadians in terms of acquiring and maintaining meaningful employment. Recently, the legal and policy landscape has changed in Canada on matters related to disability and inclusion. These policies, such as the Accessible Canada Act and the Disability Benefit Act, are meant to remove barriers and enable more equitable access to employment for those with disabilities.

Overcoming barriers is vital to fostering inclusivity. Here are a few things you can do as an employer when hiring people with disabilities. 

Despite limited opportunities, BMO’s 2013 survey found that 77% of employers reported positive results with disabled hires.

National Disability Employment Awareness Month encourages individuals, businesses, and organizations to promote inclusivity and raise awareness about the potential and capabilities of individuals with disabilities. It serves as a reminder that disability shouldn’t be a barrier to pursuing a fulfilling career. 

It’s vital to raise awareness about hidden disabilities to promote understanding and empathy within the workplace. 

How to be Inclusive of Employees with Disabilities

Accommodations aren’t always met. Statistics Canada’s 2017 survey revealed that workplace accommodations such as flexible work arrangements, workstation modifications, and human or technical support were frequently required. However, the likelihood of meeting those decreased as the number of required accommodations increased. Only 75% of employees with disabilities requiring one accommodation had their needs met, while 36% of those requiring three or more had their needs met. 

Embracing accommodations goes beyond ethics; it’s an investment in your organization’s growth and success. To create an inclusive workplace, organizations should consider various strategies:

  1. Accessible Workspaces: Make physical accommodations like ramps, accessible restrooms, and elevators to ensure everyone can navigate the workspace comfortably. Ensure physical accommodations like ramps, accessible restrooms, and elevators are in place for a comfortable work environment.
  2. Flexibility: Implementing flexible policies that cater to various needs, such as flexible hours and remote work options.
  3. Training and Sensitivity Workshops: Educate employees about disabilities, fostering empathy and understanding among colleagues. Training: Offering training on recognizing and accommodating hidden disabilities. The Ontario Human Rights Commission provides resources for employers in this regard.
  4. Recruitment and Retention Programs: Actively recruit individuals with disabilities and establish mentorship programs to support their career development.
  5. Mental Health Support: Recognize that disabilities include both visible and invisible conditions. 
  6. Open Communication: Foster open communication within the workplace, where employees feel comfortable discussing their needs and challenges.
  7. Flexibility and Training: Offer flexible work arrangements and provide training on recognizing and accommodating hidden disabilities.
  8. Recruitment and Mental Health Support: Actively recruit individuals with disabilities and provide mental health support to all employees.

Resources for Employers 

Canada provides numerous resources for building an inclusive workforce, such as 

  1. Career Edge: Connect with us, and we’ll help you find many incredible talents with disabilities and help you navigate the hiring and onboarding process.
  2.  Job Accommodation Service (JAS): JAS, offered by Employment and Social Development Canada, provides valuable resources and financial assistance to help employers make reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities.
  3. Provincial Accessibility Legislation: Many provinces, including Ontario, British Columbia, and Manitoba, have introduced accessibility legislation that mandates accessibility standards for businesses and public institutions.

By promoting inclusivity and empowering employees with disabilities to contribute their unique skills and perspectives, you’ll foster a more diverse, creative, and resilient workforce. So, let’s work together to create a Canada where everyone, regardless of their abilities, is celebrated for their contributions and can thrive in the workplace.

Quiz – What is Your Leadership Style? For Leaders and Team Members

By Employer, Succeed in your Job

Leading a team isn’t always easy; some team members are naturally “easier” to work with than others. But there is a reason behind this. This could be due to the disconnect between your leadership style and your team members’ personalities and preferred styles.

While leadership can be a fluid concept, many leaders adapt their leadership styles to suit their teams. This is especially true the more experience they get, as they learn to be lenient with what their team needs.

To become a successful leader, you must understand your current leadership style to recognize and improve your skills. Learning about different leadership styles can be the key to unlocking your team’s potential.

What is Your Leadership Style?

Understanding your leadership style can determine your compatibility with your team members and leaders, whether you’re a leader or a team member. Instead of wasting time trying to understand each other, take the following quizzes to help you and your team members know your style and find ways to work together.

Leadership Style Quiz for Leaders

Understanding your leadership style can aid in effective communication and successful collaboration with your team.

Take this quiz to determine your leadership style. 

Leadership Style Quiz for Team Members

Knowing your preferred leadership style helps you communicate effectively and work well with your team’s leaders.

Take this quiz to determine your preferred leadership style.

So what are the different Leadership Styles?

This guide explores various leadership styles, helps you identify your preferred style, and offers quizzes for both leaders and team members. Let’s dive in!

Authoritative Leadership

An authoritative leader has a clear vision and confidently communicates it to their team. They inspire and motivate team members to reach their full potential.

An Authoritative leader is likely to:

  • Have a clear vision for their team and effectively communicate it.
  • Set high standards and expectations for the team’s performance.
  • Recognize and celebrate the achievements and successes of team members.
  • Regularly analyze team performance and identify areas for improvement.

You would work best with team members who perform best when they have clear expectations and appreciate a leader who regularly evaluates the team’s performance.

Examples of Authoritative leaders

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. A remarkable leader who successfully rallied a nation toward a common vision with his strong leadership.

Democratic Leadership

Democratic leaders value collaboration and teamwork, often seeking input from team members before making decisions. This fosters a sense of ownership and promotes a positive work environment.

A Democratic leader is likely to:

  • Value and incorporate input from team members in decision-making processes.
  • Actively seek feedback from team members to improve leadership skills.
  • Welcome open communication and create a safe environment for ideas and concerns.
  • Encourage calculated risks and support innovative ideas from team members.

You would work best with a team that appreciates being involved in decision-making processes and enjoy working in a collaborative environment.

Examples of Democratic Leadership

Indra Nooyi. The ex-CEO of PepsiCo who had a collaborative approach. She listened and encouraged her team to share their thoughts and concerns.

Transformational Leadership

Transformational leaders focus on driving change and innovation. They challenge their team members to think creatively and push the boundaries of what’s possible.

A Transformational leader is likely to:

  • Challenge and encourage team members to think creatively and embrace change.
  • Delegate responsibilities and provide necessary resources to empower team members.
  • Address conflicts within the team proactively and constructively.
  • Foster a sense of shared purpose and align individual goals with organizational objectives.

You would work best with team members who are likely to thrive when the leader challenges them to be creative and fosters a sense of shared purpose.

Examples of Transformational Leadership

Jeff Bezos. Amazon’s success is due to Bezos’ innovative leadership style, which motivates employees to explore new products and opportunities.

Laissez-faire Leadership

Laissez-faire leaders give their team members high autonomy, trusting them to make decisions and solve problems independently. This style works best with experienced and self-motivated teams.

A Laissez-faire leader is likely to:

  • Trust and empower team members to make independent decisions.
  • Build strong relationships based on trust and loyalty with team members.
  • Mentor and coach team members to support their professional growth.
  • Embrace new ideas and encourage innovation within the team.

You would work best with team members who prefer working independently and making their own decisions without constant supervision.

Examples of Laissez-faire Leadership

Warren Buffet. The CEO of Berkshire Hathaway and is also known for his hands-off approach to managing his company’s subsidiaries.

Servant Leadership

Servant leaders prioritize the needs of their team members, focusing on their growth and development. They foster a supportive environment where everyone can thrive. Example: Howard Schultz, former CEO of Starbucks, who emphasized employee well-being and development throughout his tenure.

A Servant leader is likely to:

  • Prioritize the well-being and professional growth of team members.
  • Adaptable and adjust leadership style to meet the team’s needs and situation.
  • Lead by example, demonstrating the values and behaviours expected from the team.
  • Remain calm under pressure, guiding the team through challenges.

You would work best with team members who appreciate an empathetic leader who listens and encourage the well-being of the team.

Examples of Servant Leadership

Mahatma Gandhi. He led and empowered the Indian people without seeking power or status. His focus was serving their needs.

Matching Leadership Styles with Team Members

So now that you know your style and your team’s preferred leadership style, what do you do with this information?

Understanding your unique leadership style and the preferences of your team members can significantly impact team success. Here is what you can do next…

Assess Team Preferences

Once team members have identified their preferred leadership styles, openly discussing these preferences within the team is essential. This can lead to more effective collaboration and better overall team dynamics.

Adapt Leadership Approaches

No one-size-fits-all approach to leadership exists. Effective leaders must be able to adapt their style to suit the needs and preferences of their team members. Leaders can create an inclusive and supportive work environment by understanding and valuing different preferences.

Ongoing Development

Regularly reassessing leadership styles and team preferences can help leaders and team members grow and evolve. As individuals and teams develop, their preferences and needs may change, so it’s essential to maintain open communication and adapt accordingly.

By exploring various leadership styles and engaging in open conversations about preferences, you can create an environment where everyone feels supported and empowered to reach their full potential. Remember, leadership development is an ongoing process – be open to learning, adapting, and growing as a leader and team member.

recruitment mistakes

8 Common Recruitment Mistakes Employers Make and How to Avoid Them

By Employer

Recruitment is such a tedious job. You’re on a constant hunt for the best and brightest talents. Whether you’re a recruiter or an employer looking to improve your recruitment process, it’s essential to recognize the most common mistakes you could be making to streamline the process, save time and resources, and eventually secure the best talent.

In this article, we’ll provide the most common recruitment mistakes employers make, how they can hurt your business and ways to improve the process for better results.

Recruitment Mistake#1: Inadequate Job Descriptions

When it comes to finding the ideal candidate for your company, it’s essential to have an accurate job description. Unclear or broad job descriptions can attract unqualified applicants.

To ensure clarity, it’s essential to give complete and accurate information about the position and the company culture. A job description should be more than just a list of duties. It should also include the purpose of the role, important responsibilities, and necessary skills.

Here is how to create a compelling job ad that would attract the right candidate:

  • Clearly outline job responsibilities, required skills, and expectations.
  • Remove any requirements that are not a must.
  • Highlight your company’s values and culture to attract suitable candidates.
  • Write the job description in inclusive language.

Recruitment Mistake#2: Looking for the Perfect Candidate

“I’ll know the right candidate when I see them” that’s a phrase we often hear from employers, but this mentality can bring more harm than good.

Sometimes, we get this idea of the ideal employee and hope for them to magically appear. However, this approach can be detrimental as it may cause us to overlook competent callipers and result in understaffing, which impacts our team’s productivity and morale.

Recruiters call perfect candidates “purple squirrels” because they’re so rare!

Instead of holding out for someone who checks every box, it’s better to establish realistic standards – remember that some “normal candidates” can turn your business to gold when given the opportunity. Here is what you can do when you catch yourself having unrealistic expectations.

  • Revisit your list of requirements and pick out only the key must-haves. The new hire can always pick up or even learn those job-specific skills once they’re on board.
  • Consider the importance of ‘fit’ compared to experience and skills. Sometimes, hiring someone with the right personality and work style that aligns with the company can lead to a better and more loyal hire.

Recruitment Mistake#3: Unconcious Bias

As humans, we all have our biases. But in recruitment, it can be a problem that can hinder finding the best candidate for the job. Employers often rely on personal likability or gut feelings instead of focusing on skills and qualifications. This can lead to overlooking exceptional candidates who don’t fit the typical mold.

Also, keep in mind that job interviews can be intimidating, and it’s important to remember that candidates are human and might feel nervous during the process.

To reduce the impact of unconscious bias and ensure a more diverse and qualified workforce, consider the following solutions:

  • Develop a structured hiring process with a standardized phone screening, comprehensive interviews, and reference checking.
  • Clearly define the criteria for success in the role and focus on these requirements.
  • Offer diversity and inclusion training for hiring managers and HR personnel.
  • Involve colleagues from diverse backgrounds in the selection process and encourage constructive feedback.

Also read: 6 Benefits of Diversity Hiring That You May Not Know About

Recruitment Mistake#4: Overemphasis on Qualifications and Experience

Whether you’re dismissing an underqualified or rejecting someone because they are overqualified, the source of this issue is the same. Focusing too much on a candidate’s qualifications and experience might make you miss out on other essential factors like adaptability, critical thinking, and cultural fit. Remember, qualifications don’t guarantee a perfect fit!

Stressing over experience too much can deter top talent and even impact your company’s reputation. But here are some tips to help you determine the perfect fit without focusing on the experience as a factor.

  • Look beyond qualifications and consider other factors like soft skills and cultural alignment.
  • Determine if any skills can be learned on the job or if prior experience is essential. For example, hiring someone who has the technical skills but has yet to work in the same industry before.
  • Implement comprehensive onboarding programs to train new hires and bridge skill gaps.
  • Consider the benefits of hiring overqualified candidates. For example, they will be able to grow your company faster. You will have a loyal person who can move up the leadership track quicker than a junior person.
  • Discuss long-term career plans with candidates to ensure alignment.
  • Be respectful and provide feedback to the unsuccessful candidates.

Recruitment Mistake#5: Looking for “Cultural Fit”

So many leaders and HR professionals have this misconception that a cultural fit is a team member who looks the same or people coming from the same generation or the same background, etc., which can be problematic.

Focusing on cultural fit during the hiring process can fester unconscious bias, promote groupthink, and lead to workplace toxicity and even hostility.

Although misused, the term “cultural fit” is defined as a skill to match an employee’s ability to fit with the core beliefs, attitudes, and behaviours that make up an organization.

To choose a cultural fit without being biased, consider these tips:

  • Develop a clear profile of your ideal candidate, including skills, attributes, and fit cultural characteristics that align with your business’s short and long-term goals and vision.
  • Use this profile to guide your screening and interview process.
  • Ask questions in the interview that would determine if the person is truly a cultural fit, such as:
  1. Describe the environment in which you work best. (this will show you if your work setup is fit for them)
  2. Describe your ideal boss or supervisor. (this will show you their perfect leadership style)
  3. Why do you want to work for us? (this will show you if they are motivated by the same goals)
  4. Which of our company values resonates most with you? (this will show you whether their values align with your team and business)

Recruitment Mistake#6: Confusing Equality for Equity

“I only hire individuals based on their skills and background. Hiring diversity quota is not my style.” Employers often say something along those lines when the topic of hiring diversity groups comes up. But this can be so problematic!

Diversity groups face many barriers when it comes to entering and progressing in the workplace; giving equal opportunity to everyone is simply not fair. For example, a person with a disability needs an accommodation to perform and excel at their job, but many employers would rather go with someone else who won’t cost them extra money – can you see the problem?

Likewise, in this day and age, and with all the knowledge we have today, many Canadian employers still resist interviewing racial groups, especially visible minorities, who are mostly newcomers in Canada.

Newcomers to Canada have the highest unemployment rate, which is 10.8% (compared to the 5.28% unemployment rate in 2022 for their counterparts). With this behaviour, highly skilled immigrants end up with jobs that are likely to be underemployed or get trapped in low-paid, informal jobs that fail to develop and fully utilize their skills and capacities. (which is essentially why the government of Canada recruited them to the country).

It’s essential to recognize that each individual has different circumstances. That’s why equity is crucial – it ensures that everyone has the support and resources they need to reach an equal outcome.

equity vs equality career edge

Equity recruitment allows for a bigger pool of callipers which can grow in your organization and lead to more diverse leadership. Equity help supports a more inclusive and positive culture, increasing employee retention and engagement.

How to practice equity in recruitment:

  • Embrace diversity in age, race, knowledge, gender, and background while considering the specific skills, strengths, and qualifications required for the role and the entire team.
  • Put some effort into making conscious choices to give more opportunities to those facing additional barriers to joining the workforce in Canada – it will change a lot of lives, and it’ll say a lot about your business and also you as a person!
  • Partner with organizations that help underrepresented groups.

Recruitment Mistake#7: Insisting on Interviewing a Number of Candidates

Requiring to see and interview a specific number of candidates before making a decision can cause delays and may deter strong candidates. While it’s perfectly normal to consider your options, having too many options can be overwhelming and unnecessary. When you do this, you put a good candidate on hold while waiting for more applicants and risk losing your best callipers.

You need to be empathetic towards candidates and their job search process. Top talent is a hot commodity and won’t wait for long. Employers often lose top candidates to competitors due to indecisiveness and lack of communication, resulting in missed opportunities.

Here is what you should do instead to ensure you don’t waste time or talent:

  • Focus on quality over quantity when evaluating candidates
  • Be flexible with your hiring criteria and timelines
  • Set expectations and communicate the hiring process if you expect delays but want to hold their interest.

Recruitment Mistake#8: Not Sourcing the Best Candidates

Whether you are using improper job boards, social media channels, or overpaying for a recruitment agency, not using the right tool will end up attracting the wrong candidates.

Deciding where to find candidates is a crucial choice. If you’re looking for new grads who are early in their career, you’d likely find them by using social media. While experienced candidates are more likely to be accessible via traditional job boards or headhunting. Either way, you must utilize the right sourcing tool to save time and resources.

Instead of wasting a lot of resources using all the sourcing tools, focusing on the right ones will improve your candidates’ quality and reduce the work required to hire them.

How to make sure you find the best candidates:

  • Research the best platforms for your industry and target audience.
  • Use a mix of job boards, social media, and professional networks to reach the right candidates.
  • Partner with organizations to help hire people you don’t usually have access to. For example, most recruitment agencies headhunt the same people over and over again, but using different approaches can ensure you actually see different callipers.

Are you looking to attract the top candidates to add to your team?

At Career Edge, we match you with highly skilled candidates with many years of experience in different business areas, such as IT, finance, HR, and more. Ultimately, meeting your needs through a different solution that drives optimal results to match and retains top talent.

We offer a low-risk, personalized approach to helping you build a high-performing team that will help grow your team and business. Contact us today to get started!

self storage company

What it’s Like Working at a Self Storage Company

By Jobseeker

This post is written by Nikola Asambelevski 

Most people pass by dozens of self storage facilities daily without noticing them. You might need to pay more attention to self-storage facilities because the self-storage industry is booming. Self-storage is a multi-faceted industry that features job opportunities from a wide array of different disciplines. Jobs at a self-storage company include facility managers, sales representatives, maintenance technicians, software developers, marketing specialists, and many more. We will explore the recent trends in the self-storage industry, the career opportunities available in this exciting field, and how you can start your career in self-storage. 

Self-storage industry trends

Did you know that there are approximately 59,500 self-storage facilities across the globe? The United States alone boasts a jaw-dropping 2.3 billion square feet of rentable storage space, which is more than triple the size of Manhattan Island! Can you imagine that?

Meanwhile, our neighbours up north in Canada are catching up with the self-storage wave, with development surging, especially in the bustling Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and Vancouver. Ontario’s self-storage industry has been on a roll, experiencing an impressive average annual growth rate of 7.2% over the past five years, according to the Canadian Self-Storage Association.

But what’s fueling this growth, you ask? Well, a couple of factors come into play. First, the ever-increasing population density in urban areas has created a pressing need for storage solutions. As more people flock to cities, the demand for storage space only continues to rise. Second, the explosion of e-commerce has businesses scrambling for storage space to keep up with their growing inventory. So, the self-storage industry is here to stay, and it’s not showing any signs of slowing down!

Advancements in the self-storage industry

The self-storage industry in Ontario and across Canada has evolved over the years with the introduction of new technologies and services. For example, some self-storage facilities now offer climate-controlled units, which can help protect sensitive items from damage caused by temperature and humidity changes. Many self-storage facilities also offer online reservations and payments, making it easier for customers to rent and pay for their units. 

As the self-storage industry evolves to incorporate more and more technology into its facilities, new job opportunities are created to handle these changes. Self-storage facilities hire software developers to configure their websites to provide a better customer experience. Technical advisors and engineers are brought in to help self-storage facilities upgrade their systems to create a more secure storage environment for their tenants. The self-storage industry is quickly becoming one of the most popular sectors for employees with a tech background.

What does a day look like working in the self-storage industry?

One of the most surprising things people realize when they start working in the self-storage industry is how busy it can get. All types of people going through life-changing experiences need storage. Death, divorce, and moving are some of the most popular reasons why people come in to visit a self-storage facility and inquire about sizes, prices, climate-controlled units, drive-up storage units, and even vehicle parking. Working in a self-storage facility, you will interact with a wide variety of people from all walks of life. Working in a client-facing position at a self-storage company, like a leasing administrator or customer service representative, requires a great deal of patience, empathy, and advanced communication skills. 

Working at a self-storage facility also requires knowing the laws that apply to the storage facility, including renters’ rights and the laws about delinquent units. Some laws protect self-storage customers and give facility operators the right to enforce a lien and hold a public auction of outstanding units. Storage companies will do everything in their power to ensure that storage auctions do not happen at their facilities. However, auctions are a natural part of the self-storage industry. To keep units available, they must happen from time to time. It is never fun when a facility manager has to cut the lock of a unit that has become delinquent. 

The types of jobs available in the self-storage industry 

There is a common misconception that the kinds of career opportunities available in the self-storage industry are limited to general labour jobs- this could not be further from the truth. Self-storage jobs attract candidates from all kinds of different disciplines. Here are some of the most popular job positions in the self-storage industry  

  • Facility Managers- Facility managers are responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the storage facility, which includes managing staff, maintaining the facility, and ensuring customer satisfaction. Facility managers also handle customer inquiries and concerns, set rental rates, and manage the marketing of the facility.
  • Customer Service Representative- Customer service representatives provide excellent customer service, handle customer inquiries and concerns, and process rentals and payments. Customer service representatives must have excellent communication and problem-solving skills and be able to work in a fast-paced environment.
  • Maintenance Technician- Maintenance technicians are responsible for maintaining the facility and performing necessary repairs. Maintenance technicians must know plumbing, electrical, and HVAC systems and be able to troubleshoot problems and make repairs. As self-storage facilities incorporate more and more advanced technologies into their designs, the role of maintenance technicians has become crucial. 
  • Marketing Specialist- Marketing specialists are responsible for developing and implementing marketing strategies to promote the storage facility. Marketing specialists must have excellent communication and marketing skills and the ability to work in a team environment.
  • Security Officer- Security officers ensure the storage facility’s and its customers’ safety and security. Security officers must know security procedures and protocols and the ability to handle emergencies.

The self-storage industry offers numerous career opportunities for individuals with different skill sets and backgrounds. Whether you’re interested in customer service, sales, marketing, or maintenance, the self-storage industry has something for everyone. As the industry continues to grow and expand across Canada, there will be more and more job openings in this field. 

black man working remote from home

7 Practical Ways to Evaluate Remote Employees

By Employer

As remote work becomes more commonplace, it is becoming essential for managers to evaluate their remote employees’ performance effectively. While assessing remote employees may be different from evaluating in-office employees, there are still many practical ways leaders can do to get the same results, if not better. However, with the right strategies, you can boost positive company culture and increase revenue. Here are some practical tips to help you evaluate your remote employees.

1. Set Clear Goals 

The first step to effectively evaluating your remote employees is to set clear and specific goals and objectives for each individual and for the team as a whole to accomplish and communicate these expectations effectively. This can provide a measurable framework for tracking progress and ensuring everyone is on the same page. Regular check-ins and performance reviews can also provide feedback and identify areas for improvement.

2. Use Performance Metrics

As an employer, you can use performance metrics to track the work of employees who are working from home. This can include sale numbers, project completion times, task completion rates, and error rates. This helps employers see how productive their team is, how well they meet targets, and where they may need additional training or support.

3. Utilize the Right Tools

Another way to assess your remote team’s progress is to use project management or monitoring tools. These tools can track time spent on specific assignments and the tasks each person is working on, and they can also provide metrics and insight for the use of resources. Using these tools can help streamline a system for your peace of mind and boost your team’s productivity.

4. Cultivate Trust in Remote Teams

Plenty of studies indicate that micromanaging your employees is your recipe for a toxic culture, leading to a toxic work environment. Trust, however, is the glue that holds remote teams together.

To build trust, start by setting clear goals that are easy to measure and communicate these to your team. But building trust in a remote environment isn’t easy – it takes effort and creativity. You need to create a culture that fosters relationships and connections among your team members, even if they’re scattered across the globe. Remember, trust isn’t just a feel-good factor – it’s a vital ingredient for boosting engagement and achieving extraordinary outcomes. In a remote setting, results matter, and employees need the tools, support, and freedom to make decisions, solve problems, and make mistakes.

Building a culture of trust makes a meaningful difference in both employee engagement and company outcomes by enabling higher productivity, better-quality products, and increased profitability.

5. Encourage Open Communication

Communication is essential for evaluating remote employees. Leadership should encourage remote employees to communicate frequently with colleagues and supervisors, fostering the culture and building trust within your company.

Regular and effective communication is critical for ensuring everyone is on the same page and that all team members can contribute to the project’s success. This can include frequent virtual meetings with clear and concise communication about expectations and deadlines. Regular check-ins can also help you stay on top of the employee’s progress and help catch any issues that may arise.

6. Provide Feedback for Remote Employees

Regular feedback to your remote employees keeps them engaged and motivated. Be sure to praise employees for a job well done and provide constructive feedback when necessary. This will help employees to improve their performance and stay motivated to reach their goals.

7. Offer Training and Development

Investing in training and development for your remote employees can help them stay updated with the latest skills and knowledge needed to excel in their jobs. This can be done through online training courses or webinars. Providing training and development opportunities benefits your team and helps your company stay competitive. For example, managers can provide opportunities for remote employees to learn new skills and take on new challenges, which can help to demonstrate their capabilities and adaptability. Additionally, managers can encourage remote employees to take on leadership roles within the team, which can provide valuable experience and help to build their confidence and expertise.

Overall, there are many practical ways managers can evaluate their remote employees’ performance. By setting clear goals and objectives, using tracking and monitoring tools, fostering effective communication, and providing opportunities for learning and leadership, managers can effectively assess the productivity and effectiveness of their remote teams. With these tips, you can create a positive work culture, improve employee retention rates, and increase revenue.

diverse candidate to hire

Find Your Perfect Candidate Match with Career Edge’s Talent Solution

By Employer

Finding candidates to hire is no easy feat. You hired recruiters and worked with tons of recruitment agencies who brought the same candidates over and over again. It makes sense; using the same techniques and the same network can only get you the same results.

If you’re looking for fresh faces and a partner who truly cares about your business and its unique needs, Look no further than Career Edge! We are a team of dedicated professionals who pride ourselves on providing exceptional talents to the job market.

How is Career Edge different?

We help newcomers to Canada, recent graduates and people with disabilities kick-start their careers by connecting them with the right opportunities. We have an incredible database of candidates who are extremely well-educated and have extensive and international backgrounds. We are also working with an extended network of partners from all backgrounds to source the best candidates to hire.

At Career Edge, we understand the challenges employers face when trying to find the perfect candidate. That’s why we go above and beyond to identify the best and most diverse candidates for your business. We especially help underrepresented groups launch their careers in Canada through our novel internship model. Want to learn more about our internship model, contact us today!

Why work with Career Edge

We work closely with you to understand your business and its specific needs to ensure that we fully understand the skills, experience, and qualities that are most important to your organization. This approach allows us to tailor our search to find candidates who not only meet your requirements but also align with your company’s culture and values.

At Career Edge, we believe in providing a positive candidate experience. We understand that hiring can be stressful, which is why we make every effort to ensure a smooth and efficient process. We keep candidates informed and engaged throughout the process, providing feedback and support along the way.

How to make an impact

We are proud to support newcomers to Canada, recent graduates, and people with disabilities in launching and developing their careers. By working with Career Edge, you are not only finding the best candidates for your business but also contributing to creating more diverse and inclusive workplaces while helping underrepresented groups.

What other employers are saying about Career Edge

“A very positive experience – I’ve had recruiters make promises in the past but never deliver. Career Edge has always delivered.”

– Nicole Bell
Talent Acquisition Specialist at Ricoh

“Career Edge makes the recruitment process painless. They provide high-quality applicants, and they are always available for support.”

– Shirley Abi-Ad
Human Resources Manager at Dr. Oetker

We invite you to join our community and experience the difference that Career Edge can make for your organization. Contact us today to learn more about how we can help you find the talent you need to succeed. Together, let’s build a brighter future for our businesses and our communities.